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Author Topic: Superfatting  (Read 5379 times)
madimoo85
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« on: May 02, 2012, 09:33:57 AM »

I am new to soapmaking (have made a few M&P batches, one CP batch and one HP batch), and I don't think I really understand the whole superfatting thing. For a CP soap batch, do I just add in some extra oil at the end to superfat my soap? Do I just guess at the amount I need to add? Thanks for your help!
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soap1967
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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2012, 12:39:03 PM »

There are two different ways to superfat.  The easiest is to do a lye discount.  On soapcalc.net adjust the percentage of superfat you want and the recipe will be figured out for you.  You will not be adding any oils in at the end. 
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machine011
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2012, 02:06:38 PM »

The above method is good, but... Say there are 4 different types of oils in your soap recipe. Doing it this way you don't know for sure how much of and what oils were left unchanged in your soap after saponification has occured. 

The other method (adding the oil after trace) lets you manipulate which oil you superfat. Say you want to 5% superfat your soap with Jojoba oil. Figure out your recipe on soapcalc with 0% superfat, mix your oils and lye solutions as usual. Then add 5% Jojoba oil after trace.
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soap1967
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2012, 04:18:32 PM »

Sorry machine I have to disagree with you - too many chemists have tested the methods and disproven that this method allows you to 'choose" which fats are left as superfat.  Check out Caveman Chemistry.

With that said either method works.
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madimoo85
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2012, 07:52:19 PM »

Thank you both for answering. I use soapcalc but have never used the superfatting option. I will use it for my next recipe though!
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falldowngobump
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2012, 06:51:38 AM »

Soap Calc is great to play around with and the best part...it does all the math for you.  I normally SF 6-8% cause my skin likes it.  I agree with Soap 1967-- there is no way to superfat with a particular oil, the lye will take what it wants, and leaves the rest no matter when you add the superfat oil.  I factor in the SF and add it to all the rest of the oils at the beginning.  It's one less thing for me to add (or forget to add).
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JuJuBean
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« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2012, 04:08:31 PM »

with homemade soap, its necessary to use a little bit less lye than needed to completely turn all the oils into soap.  This is to avoid any extra lye hanging around.  A superfatting oil would be any oil that has a high percentage of unsaponifiables, jojoba for example.  There is no difference in adding the superfatting oil to the base oils or adding it in at trace because the lye will saponify whatever it comes in contact with; at trace there is still active lye.  you don't even need to add a specific oil to the mix for purposes of superfatting.  a lye discount of 5% produces a superfat of oils that have not been turned to soap just as adding extra oil does.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 12:43:08 PM by JuJuBean » Logged
tcrllc
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« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2012, 12:45:54 PM »

When using soapcalc, do you only put the percentage, or do you put the percentage and also add the oil to the ingredients?  
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panzerakc
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« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2012, 06:35:32 PM »

When using soapcalc, do you only put the percentage, or do you put the percentage and also add the oil to the ingredients?  

All you need to do is plug in the percentage.  As I understand it, what SoapCalc does is formulate a lye amount that is X% (X being your chosen superfat amount - 5, 8, whatever) LESS than what is needed to totally saponify all your oils.

For instance, let's say you have a recipe with a zero superfat.  And lets say that whatever oils you are using, it's going to take 100 grams of lye of saponify all your oils at that zero percent superfat.

If you then take that same recipe, but give it an 8% superfat, once you've recalculated (or let SoapCalc do it for you!), you will then need 92 grams of lye.  There will be 8% of your oils that won't saponify, which gives you your 8% superfat.

And for the record, "lye discount" and "superfat" pretty much mean the same thing.

Hope that helps.

Anita
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tcrllc
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« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2012, 09:11:25 PM »

Ok, so what you are saying is it reduces the lye amount based on your superfat percentage. So if I put 2 oz castor oil in the ingredients and 4% superfat, it will adjust the lye? Or do I just leave the castor oil out of it and do that on my own?
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JuJuBean
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« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2012, 01:00:00 AM »

Ok, so what you are saying is it reduces the lye amount based on your superfat percentage. So if I put 2 oz castor oil in the ingredients and 4% superfat, it will adjust the lye? Or do I just leave the castor oil out of it and do that on my own?

Put all your ingredients into the calculator with your desired superfat/lye discount percentage.  It does it all for you. 
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tcrllc
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« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2012, 08:25:58 AM »

Great thanks Smiley
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Opulence
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« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2012, 01:23:34 PM »

 . . . or, if you want a better chance of the castor oil superfatting set your superfat to 0%, don't include the castor oil in the soap calculator; and add it at the end at trace.

The amount of lye is determined based on the oils in the list; if castor is NOT included in the list, it would NOT be included in the lye count.  

There is no guarantee on which oils will be discounted but if you don't include the castor in the oils used to calculate the lye . . . you have the best chance of superfatting the castor oil.

« Last Edit: May 12, 2012, 08:28:04 PM by Opulence » Logged

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tcrllc
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« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2012, 02:21:55 PM »

This is all good to know. I had made a big batch a few weeks ago and forgot to add my castor oil at the end, BUT I didn't include the oil on soapcalc, just put 5%. So, here I've been thinking my soap will turn out lye heavy when in fact it will be perfect! I am going to test it anyway today. Thanks!
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JuJuBean
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« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2012, 08:20:59 PM »

If you want to guarantee that the castor oil is not turned into soap, doing hot process method, you can add the castor it after the soap batter gells.  I use this method for lots of different additives, primarily boozy drinks; its just a pain in the butt to work with.
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