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Question: How to make african black soap
How to make - 2 (28.6%)
need recipe - 5 (71.4%)
Total Voters: 7

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Author Topic: african black soap  (Read 5364 times)
rociomendez
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« on: September 07, 2011, 02:37:47 PM »

Does anyone know how to make this soap? I am looking for a recipe. i can find this soap in some local shops but i would like to make it.
Any suggestions out there?
It is made by some guys in NY for what I have read on the soap box.
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Baron Hawkins
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« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2011, 06:28:55 PM »

From what I have read true black soap comes from Africa. There are ingredients in it native only to Africa, and processed in such a way that is only passed from generation to generation. It is an amazing thing but to make true African Black Soap, I believe, will be very difficult to do out side of Africa. If you do prove me wrong, please let me know. I do not wish to discourage you in your endeavor, this is just what I understand.   
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livingsprings
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« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2011, 02:45:20 AM »

Yes I agree with Baron Hawkins, authentic African black soap comes from Africa made with ingredients from Africa mainly West Africa. Ghana Nigeria Togo are the main producers of this wonderful soap. It the soap is authentic then it is probably just packaged in the US.
The recipe is passed down the generation. each family has their own recipe and their own method even though the basic method may be the same there are a few twist here and there. Some are milder than others.
Here's a recipe I was given a some years ago I may omit 1 or 2 ingredients because it was a long time ago and I can't remember where I wrote it. this is authentic I was in Ghana. Each country has its own version and each family has its own version of the country's version.

Ash from plantain leaves
Ash from cocoa pods
palm kernel oil
 coconut oil
Shea butter

That's all I can remember. I hope it helps somehow.

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Opulence
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2011, 06:30:58 PM »

I love Black Soap.  Before I started making soap, all I used was Raw Black Soap (Raw Black Soap isn't processed, as a matter of fact, it isn't even black - it's more tan and dark brown and has a softer texture).  The recipe given earlier sounded like the same one I found.  They make the "ash" or lye out of plantain skins, the pods and something else.  Sure, you can make a "black" soap; it just wont be original Black Soap from Ghana or Africa.

I love black soap so much that I've incorporated Raw Black Soap into my recipes and have made a liquid shampoo with a Raw Black Soap base.  I made an awesome Raw Bar . . . it included fresh Banana, Raw Black Soap, Raw Goat Milk and Raw Honey . . . it was delicious!

Don't waste your time trying to make it . . . if you want some, there are plenty of places where you can purchase it on line.
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rociomendez
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« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2011, 06:12:36 AM »

Thanks guys for all of the input. I think I will just buy it. sounds like it would be to hard to make it.
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Opulence
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« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2011, 02:19:40 PM »

Speaking of African Black Soap . . . tonight I'm giving honor to the Sweet Potatoe pie by making a body bar that includes the following raw ingredients:  fresh sweet potatoe, African Black Soap, shea butter, Goat's milk & Wildflower Honey.  I may also use a little cinnamon. 

I have not decided on whether or not to use an essential oil to fragrance.  Any fragrance suggestions?

Thanks!
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livingsprings
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« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2011, 12:16:14 PM »

I think something that depicts the continent since all your ingredients can be found in Africa.
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rociomendez
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« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2011, 04:01:09 PM »

sounds so yummy please post your recipe.
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Opulence
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« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2011, 06:15:57 PM »

I forgot to add the Grapefruit Seed Extract in the sweet potato black soap recipe.
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ceebee2001
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« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2011, 08:57:15 AM »

I just found in my files a recipe for African Black  soap.
I have never made it and don't think I ever will, (can't be sure of the measurements)  but it was an interesting recipe, so I saved it.


African Black Soap


This recipe is as it is made in Africa.

Ingredients:
Handful of Cocoa Pods
3 pieces of Shea Bark
Skin of one Plantain
1 cup Palm Oil
3/4 cup Unrefined Shea Butter
Fragrance or Essential Oils

Directions:
Ash mixed with water become lye. So wear protective equipment and handle this with the same care given to any other cold process soap recipe.

Remove the cocoa beans from their pods. Roast the pods, plantain skin and shea bark in the pot on low-medium heat until ash is formed, preferably outside. Carefully add 2 cups water and bring the mixture to boil then lower the heat. Once ashes have dissolved, carefully strain the solution through a fine strainer and set aside. Place the palm oil in another double boiler and heat it to about 35C. Carefully mix in the ash water and stir until the mixture is smooth. After 45 minutes you will start to see froth form on the top. Scoop this into a cooling container until nearly all the water has evaporated from the pot. This froth will become your black soap. Remove the pot from heat. After the froth has partially cooled, add fragrance or essential oils, pour into molds and allow to cure for 2 weeks. Remove from molds and the soap is ready for use.


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moski
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« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2013, 12:35:16 AM »

The problem with "authentic recipes" is "Each country has its own version and each family has its own version of the country's version." which in truth makes any soap made to that style with those ingredients African black soap. It's hard to discriminate the difference between the recipe of an family from Ghana and that of a Nigerian as more authentic over the other due to wide geographic variation. Both have made black soap. And unless you hinge on a "Made in Africa" label how strictly can you hold one over the other. Sashimi made in Georgia is still Sashimi.

A lot of this appears to be mysticism to my eye in reference to the recipes. I've been reading everything I can find about the soap and it's making and while on the one hand speaking about how each tribe has a different recipe based on local tradition and ingredients and some that are left out altogether, they freely use "authentic" to describe all of those soaps. I shouldn't even get into the variance in even one person's recipe where ingredients aren't measured consistently(how much is a handful, and whose hand?), variation in lye content in the ashes (of varying compositions) from batch to batch, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride ratio in the ash lye. How can you imply singular authenticity in a product that could conceivably have 50 or more discrete formulations based on country/tribe/village.

Some of these writers/sellers appear to be using the same copy which quotes how the makers use simple ingredients the stay close to nature and mother earth, and how it's "Unique" since it's unscented.

Sorry if I've ranted but "Native anything" mysticism and near superstitious attributions really gets on my very last nerve.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 03:28:38 AM by moski » Logged
janeau
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« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2013, 05:40:32 AM »

  ....... "interesting"
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rosemc
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« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2013, 07:39:35 AM »

I have 2 friends one from Ethiopia and one from Ghana. Two completely different soaps. In Ethiopia, he told me, woman bang an plant called Endob with wood to make their soap. I searched all over and cannot find the Endob plant.
Gifty told me that in Ghana they make a Rooibos Tea Soap. Again I cant find that either.
You are all right about one thing every one has a different recipe. Just like my family with our pasta sauses. We make them the way our parents tought us.
My neighbor brought me a sample of 'Coal Face Cleanser" from
Lush and the ingredients are vague. It says "Lather this charcoal, Rosewood and Sandal wood face soap to absorb excess sembum & reduce redness. Not much info there.
I will ask Gifty if her family has a recipe and let you know.
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moski
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« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2013, 12:54:19 AM »

Does anyone know how to determine the lye comp and concentration in ash based lye solutions?  It would be interesting to make a similar soap, obviously not African, using their methods but modern controls.
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chathuraprabath
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« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2013, 07:52:11 AM »

African black soap

African black soap is my favorite Body Shop soaps, its performance is superb and the fragrance stays on the skin for ages after you have washed, I would recommend this to anyone. It makes bath time a wonderful experience.
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