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Author Topic: Thinking out loud about CPOP  (Read 13478 times)
Opulence
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« Reply #45 on: January 30, 2012, 06:53:25 AM »

My CPOP varied as well . . . which was very discouraging and disappointing.  You have to know your oven, as well.  I have a convection which should cut cooking time by 10 to 15 minutes (in most cases).

As result, I've decided to only keep my batch in the preheated oven to get a complete or full gel only; which takes approximately 15 minutes at 170 degrees.  After the 15 minutes or so (I usually eye-ball it by the way the soap looks), I turn off the oven and leave the mold in the oven over night . . . or until I need the oven.  If not, I remove the mold from the oven and insulate it.

Depending on the recipe, keeping a batch in the oven @ 170 degrees for 1 hour seems like a very long time to me . . . especially if you're using Steve's acrylic mold that holds heat very well.
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riverhouserustics
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« Reply #46 on: February 01, 2012, 09:28:06 AM »

I wonder if one built a wooden frame covered with plastic and put it over top of a dehumidifier and then put the soap in the same plastic contained box (using racks) if the cure time would lessen significantly in a short amount of time.  I am thinking about giving this a try.  Any thoughts?
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soap1967
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« Reply #47 on: February 01, 2012, 10:00:02 AM »

After much research I have concluded there is little that hastens cure.  Water discounting doesn't speed it up, CPOP I used to think did but I know now it doesnt. Some info on this forum regarding a dehydrator but still no definitive proof that it works and I have read success stories and horror (melted soaps) stories with this method.

The evaporation of water in soap has to do with surface area exposed, humidity, air circulation and heat.  Your dehumidifier idea sounds good but you will just have to try and see.

Per a suggestion on here I did install a heat lamp in my curing closet and a fan.  I think this has helped.  It may shave off a COUPLE of days at most.  I am more happy that it keeps moisture off the surface of my soap.

I no longer investigate this curing question.   If something was out there that worked we would all know it by now.
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diana
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« Reply #48 on: February 01, 2012, 01:31:15 PM »

My CPOP varied as well . . . which was very discouraging and disappointing.  You have to know your oven, as well.  I have a convection which should cut cooking time by 10 to 15 minutes (in most cases).

As result, I've decided to only keep my batch in the preheated oven to get a complete or full gel only; which takes approximately 15 minutes at 170 degrees.  After the 15 minutes or so (I usually eye-ball it by the way the soap looks), I turn off the oven and leave the mold in the oven over night . . . or until I need the oven.  If not, I remove the mold from the oven and insulate it.

Depending on the recipe, keeping a batch in the oven @ 170 degrees for 1 hour seems like a very long time to me . . . especially if you're using Steve's acrylic mold that holds heat very well.


Did it leave your colors alot darker and different? I agree that they were a lot less sticky to cut and I could usually unmold and cut with no problem after about 12 hours, no matter what oils I put in.
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StampinFairy
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« Reply #49 on: February 03, 2012, 04:03:56 AM »

I made my first new batch of soap (since August) last night!  ok, my husband did the work, but I was watching closely!

we put the mold inthe oven for an hour at 170 and it looked like the center was whiter than the edges.  In my opinion it looked like it could ahve gone in longer, but it was past my bed time, so I took it out and wrapped it in blankets.

I just reread some of this thread and realized I could have left it in the oven (off) over night but I wonder if the blankets helped at all.  I will resist opening it now and will get back to you tonight when I go to but it. 

does the fact that the center was darker than the edges mean that the gel stage was nearing the edges but had not yet made it?  I never get to see get stage when I wrap in blankets and leave it until 24 hours later. Plus its been so long that I kind of forget what's supposed to be happeneing.

thanks...
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soap1967
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« Reply #50 on: February 03, 2012, 05:36:33 AM »

Generally at the end of the hour my soap all looks consistently gelled.  Different formula's do different things - guess we will have to see what happened when you take a peek today!
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StampinFairy
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« Reply #51 on: February 04, 2012, 04:03:52 PM »

I cut that batch after it was in the mold for about 35 hours. (It was still warm at 22 hours so I let it sit another night)

It was white all the way though, a nice white and the Sodium Lactate made it nice and hard.  I nearly had a difficult time cutting.  It looks great.

My hubby made Lavender this morning and it was in the oven for 1 hour, he said it looked uniformly white.  Not sure why the first batch was not uniform at one hour. 


either way, I dig this oven gel process.The only bad thing is that I can't make a batch, wrap it up, then go to bed.  Gotta start earlier. haha
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mavanbeke
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« Reply #52 on: August 10, 2012, 05:38:59 AM »

Since Steve addressed this in the newsletter, I hope someone else will go to the forum.  I have used CPOP with success sometimes, but my main issue with the process is that I get a layer of air bubbles on top of the soap that can be unattractive.  I don't know why it happens sometimes but not others, but you know how soap has a mind of its own!  I have tried to be careful not to mix in excess air, and I tap the mold repeatedly to encourage the air out before I put it in the oven.  I have also had the loaf rise and crack down the middle a few times.  Since I already discount water to make a harder bar, and I have learned to plan ahead for stocking what I need, I have mostly quit using CPOP, but I wonder if anyone else has dealt with the excessive air bubble issue.
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situ
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« Reply #53 on: August 10, 2012, 07:53:53 AM »

I used the CPOP method a few times and also liked it, but quit due to the bubbles and cracking. I make CP soap and routinely insulate to encourage gel, which I much prefer over non-gel soaps. I rarely use GM, so don't have the issues with it.  I did not discount water much in the batches I put in the oven. I don't know how to get around the bubbles and cracking, although I found that, while warm, if you can push on the sides of the mold you can push most small cracks closed.
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monianne
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« Reply #54 on: September 21, 2012, 04:26:34 AM »

I have watched a lady online who is a product tester for a soap maker and she does all methods including cpop.  She adds stearic acid to her cpop recipes, cures her soaps in her oven at 170 for 1-2 hours. But after that she takes them out and from time to time she says she leaves them in until the oven is cooled.  And she is of the opinion that they are ready to go in about 2 weeks. She also seems relaxed about the whole process; I know she sells her soap and I get the distinct impression she is selling cpop soaps after the two week period.  Hope this helps anyone out there.   Smiley 
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tatisoap
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« Reply #55 on: December 21, 2012, 03:51:30 PM »

I'm fairly new to soap making and have not as yet tried CPOP. Reading this thread and the discussion on whether CPOP soap needs to be cured, I wonder if anyone has ever thought of testing this:  Make a batch of soap. Divide it in 2 equal parts and pour each one into its own mold. One mold gets the CPOP treatment, the other gets the regular insulation/blankets and a 4 week cure.
After the CPOP batch comes out of the oven, (let it cool first) weigh it and record this weight ('cause you're going to have to wait 4 weeks before needing this information).
For the second batch (the non-CPOP one), after the 4-week cure, weight it. Now compare the weight of the CPOP soap after it came out of the oven with the weight of the non-CPOP soap after its 4-week cure.  If they are the same, then this means that the CPOP soap does not need to be cured as all the water that would have evaporated during curing is already gone as a result of its ride in the oven.
If the weight of the CPOP soap is heavier, then it does need curing - the length of which will depend on how much water is left.
If the weight of the CPOP soap is lighter, well then we can all rejoice, climb in the oven and use our soap right then and there!
Well, seriously though, this might be a way of finding out once and for all.  I may try this if I ever get organized enough, but if anyone else is interested, we'd love to hear the results!
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llbarnum
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« Reply #56 on: April 12, 2013, 09:53:48 PM »

just read thru this post...found it very interesting...the diff thoughts on cure time...my input into this is that i do notice that from the 6 to 8 week time frame my soaps get real hard and do a final shrink...and r a more mild soap..so for me i do 8 week cure..every1 likes the harder bar that it gives...i have started discounting liquid but so far i think it still takes that 6 to8 weeks to get the last little cure on it..imo..
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