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Author Topic: Lye and Pyrex  (Read 1647 times)
brnicholas
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« on: July 09, 2013, 02:17:36 AM »

I think it may be time to bring up this subject again because from reading some posts on this forum I have a feeling that some are using Pyrex to mix their lye solutions. This can be very dangerous. I have had Pyrex shatter but luckily it was over the sink. It's my understanding that Pyrex made in Europe is safe but that which is made in the USA is not. It has an ingredient (a silica or something) that is not resistant to lye. The lye will eventually etch the glass and the heat will cause it to shatter. You can search this site for more information on the subject or just google it. I just don't want anyone to get hurt.

Br Nicholas
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2013, 07:01:45 AM »

Thanks, I haven't used any of my pyrex but just assumed that it could be used. Just curious, can mason jars be used?
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Karla10
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2013, 07:20:37 AM »

Thanks Brother Nicholas! 

Not much worse than lye accidents!

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Studio Olivia
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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2013, 08:22:19 AM »

The safest thing to use is a plastic pitcher that has the number 5 on the bottom.  It can take the heat.  Never trust glass jars.  They can shatter and you don't want to know what can happen to your kitchen.  It remodels everything!  If you are going to use glass jars anyway, then please put your vinegar in a spray bottle.  That way you can spray everything immediately and maybe avoid some of the damage.
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lromero333
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2013, 01:45:36 PM »

Thank you for this info! I'm a newbie to soap making and have been using the Pyrex for my lye water. Luckily I have a #5 plastic container that I can switch over to.  Grin
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JuJuBean
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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2013, 02:52:46 PM »

I live on the edge!
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Studio Olivia
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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2013, 01:00:46 PM »

I bought a set of Borosilicate lab beakers and I am sure they can stand the heat.  But, I prefer to use them to weigh my oils.  No more scraping around ridges and designs in my plastic bowls.  These are a dream!  You can get almost every single drop of oil out of them.  I should get an old lightweight blanket and mix the lye in one of the beakers in the sink and cover it with the blanket just in case it explodes.  I need to see if they can take the heat.  Now I am super curious.  Sandalwood soap is waiting to be made, so its a good opportunity to try. Wish me luck!
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brnicholas
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2013, 01:08:09 AM »

From what I understand, Pyrex used to be a brand of Borosilicate, until about 15 years ago when they stopped using it in favor of lime. Lime is much cheaper. It's the etching of the glass caused by the lye that will cause the Pyrex to shatter. Borosilicate glass has been know to break but when it does it is a crack which is much easier to deal with than a shatter and this has only happened with extreme temperature changes so I would think it would be safe for mixing lye (even with ice) but I would still do it over the sink.

Br Nicholas
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jtrevimt
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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2013, 03:23:48 PM »

HORRIBLE, all my crystalwear in the lab is Pyrex-Borosylicate. But this people should let consumers know if they have stopped using it on home products. Am I doing well using Anchor Hocking?
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brnicholas
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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2013, 02:07:41 AM »

I just looked at a large Pyrex measuring cup to see if it has any kind of warning on it and it does. It says For Microwave, not for Stove or Lab use. It's in very tiny red print but you can read it. I also have an Anchor measuring cup and it says the same thing. I would think that mixing lye and water would be considered Lab use.

Corning changed the formula in 1998 so any Pyrex purchased prior to then should be safe.

Br Nicholas
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Studio Olivia
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« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2013, 07:44:40 AM »

Thanks for the info...I am going to stick to mixing lye in the #5 plastic pitcher I have.  The lye doesn't even seem to etch it.  So far so good! Smiley
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jtrevimt
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« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2013, 03:52:02 PM »

Yes, lye and water is like lab use. It is an exotermic reaction. Thus the importance of personal protective equipement.
G
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Studio Olivia
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« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2013, 07:36:39 PM »

Thanks, jtrevimt!  It's been about 40+ years since I have read that term.   Grin Shocked Roll Eyes Wink Smiley
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rosemc
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« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2013, 12:19:31 PM »

I switched from plastic to glass because I thought it was safer. I looked at my plastic measuring cups and none of them have a number on them. What do you think I should use?
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shunt2012
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« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2013, 07:17:12 AM »

You can buy #5 plastic pitchers at Walmart, Kmart or any kitchen store.  I've even found them at Salvation Army and other thrift stores.  They will have a 5 inside a little triangle or circle on the bottom of the container.
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