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Author Topic: Grapefruit seed extract (as a preservative)  (Read 4061 times)
sudsmum
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« on: March 09, 2012, 08:47:31 PM »

Hi!  Is it highly recommended to use GSE in goat milk soap?  What other soaps additives would cause you to add GSE to a batch?  Is there a recommended amount that works best?  What brand do you recommend?  Thanks!
« Last Edit: March 10, 2012, 04:51:31 AM by sudsmum » Logged

ceebee2001
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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2012, 09:03:05 PM »

WHy would you want to add GSE to a soap?  Isn't the common use of GSE is an anti-oxident that is added to the oils when you first get them to help with shelf life? 
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sudsmum
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« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2012, 09:58:17 PM »

I read somewhere when I was researching different goat milk recipes that it is useful as a preservative and is a powerful antibacterial agent.  If that is the case, I figured that more experienced soapers may use it in soaps with other food-type additives such as cucumbers, for example...  I'm sure that it is also good for increasing the shelf-life of oils.  I don't really know for sure so thought I'd ask.  One recipe that includes it is found at http://www.pvsoap.com/recipe_man_beard_shaving_soap.htm.  Just figured that perhaps it is something that expert soapers might know about and use often...  Thanks!
« Last Edit: March 09, 2012, 10:20:03 PM by sudsmum » Logged

soap1967
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2012, 04:44:09 AM »

I don't use GSE in soap I don't use it period.  GSE is only a preservative due to the chemicals used to actually preserve the GSE - Grapefruit seed extract alone does not preserve anything. It doesn't bother me personally to have preservatives; however, you just don't know if your GSE does or doesn't.

The best preservative for soap is vitamin E or Tocopherol.  If you use oils that have decent quantities of vitamin E you will get the benefit without adding any in.  Also being aware of shelf life of your oils and avoiding oils that commonly go rancid quickly (flax, canola) should help out. 

I have soap that is 2 years old that is still fine (and its all GM).  I have yet to smell rancid soap.  Overly superfatting your soap is another red flag for rancidity so keeping it moderate should help you avoid this as well.
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sudsmum
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« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2012, 04:55:55 AM »

Yay!  That is just what I needed to know!  Soap1967, THANK you!
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Squeaky Clean
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« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2012, 09:05:34 AM »

Yes, it is the Triclosan that makes GSE a preservative.  I bought a bottle before I learned this and haven't used a drop of it.
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Opulence
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« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2012, 01:47:42 PM »

While we would all love to use natural products as preservatives, we are confusinig antioxidants with preservatives.

According to the Merriam - Webster Dictionary, preservatives are "an additive used to protect against decay, discoloration, or spoilage". The only way to do that with certainty is to add a chemical agent.

However, there are natural items that can reduce microbial activity (such as essential oils) and can have some preservative qualities.
 
Technically, the following items are antioxidants and not preservatives. Oxidation occurs when light and air hits oils and turns them rancid. Antioxidants are designed to protect the oils from spoiling and opening the door to other contaminants. This process cannot be stopped completely, but using an antioxidant considerably slows down the process. Using an antioxidant will increase the shelf life of natural products and are still safe for your skin. The top three natural antioxidants used in natural skin care are listed below:

Rosemary Extract (INCI Nomenclature: Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract) Also known as rosemary oleoresin.

Distilled from rosemary leaves, rosemary extract is perhaps the most effective of this antioxidant class. It is not the same as rosemary essential oil. Rosemary Extract (ROE) is a stronger formulation and includes more of the products of distillation. Using ROE will give off a slight herbaceous smell, but it can be covered or enhanced by other fragrances. In fact, many manufacturers create formulas that highlight the rosemary scent. ROE is oil soluble and should be blended in the oil stage of making lotions and creams.
 
Vitamin E (INCI Nomenclature: Tocopherols)
 
The oldest and most well known of all antioxidants. Vitamin was the first to be introduced to the market and was not only used as an antioxidant, but as a moisturizer. Like ROE, Vitamin E is oil soluble. Not only can vitamin E add to the creaminess of a blend it does provide protection. There are 2 types of vitamin E oil available: natural (d-tocopherol) and synthetic (dl-tocopherol). Only the natural vitamin E has antioxidant value. If you wish to use vitamin E for its protection qualities you can find NATURAL Vitamin E in capsules from health food stores.
 
Grapefruit Seed Extract (INCI: Citrus Grandis and Glycerin)
 
A newcomer to the natural preservative category, grapefruit seed extract is just that – the extract from pulverized grapefruit seeds. Many people use GSE for its anti-fungal properties and some antimicrobial activity. Due to these qualities, it is suggested GSE may be more powerful than ROE or Vitamin E.
 
However, there is some debate as to the efficacy of using GSE. Again, GSE is not a true preservative, but an antioxidant. The other major downfall of GSE is that it is also extracted with synthetic compounds, including methylparaben.

http://caren-young.suite101.com/natural-preservatives-a65795
« Last Edit: March 10, 2012, 03:23:07 PM by Opulence » Logged

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ceebee2001
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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2012, 02:38:12 PM »

Thank you Opulence for your post. That is what I was trying for this morning but unable to process my thoughts.
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Opulence
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« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2012, 03:23:28 PM »

ceebee,
You're welcome!
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« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2012, 03:24:27 PM »

wow very useful information here, when I took a class to make soap the instructor used & said to use GSE to preserve the soap. It cost a fortune 27.00 for 4oz anyway on one batch I forgot to put it in and everything worked out just fine and soap lasted just as lone hmmm thank you forum
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Birdie
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« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2012, 05:54:04 AM »

I've used Biopein in a lotion and sent it for testing. It works great for preserving.  It also has a scent of its own and not everyone will like it.  The scent is very, very herbal and is impossible to mask. you can synergize it but not mask it.
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soap1967
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« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2012, 06:05:31 AM »

OP  - what do you think about this product? (Birdie she is our resident expert in things like this).  Looks like a mix of essential oils - so wouldn't that be antioxident and opposed to preservative???
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velvet
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« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2012, 06:31:05 AM »

As a matter of fact by simply using oil of oregano everything bacterial gets killed.
The mixture has the preservative power, and it is a great alternative for those who want to stay away from Germall plus, Tinosan, etc.,  or other skin friendly preservatives. I bet it is quite expensive.
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Shelly Holland
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« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2012, 10:50:22 AM »

Hi Birdie ~
Very interesting info on the Biopein product.  Can you share where you purchase this product, in what size and what the cost is?  I have searched but have found no website that sells it.  I found the parent company and they list only one distributor in the U.S.  Anyway, any info you can share would be very much appreciated.
I have purposely avoided making lotions and creams as I never could find a preservative that I would be willing to put on my skin regularly.

Shelly
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Opulence
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« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2012, 04:28:05 PM »

Hi,
 
I quickly researched the individual ingredients in Biopein.  While they are all great "powerhouse" ingredients, none of them were considered preservatives on their on . . . maybe they are preservatives when combined!  I read some of the descriptions; most of the write-ups did not contain the word "preservative."

I know we don't like synthetics but for purposes of this exercise, I will reference one any way . . .

Compare Germaben II and Biopein:

Germaben II is a convenient, ready-to-use broad spectrum anti-microbial preservative for personal care products such as shampoos, conditioners, lotions, creams, body sprays and other formulations. It is highly effective against gram positive and gram negative bacteria, yeasts and molds and does not need any additional preservatives.

vs.

Biopein is a proprietary synergistic combination of botanical extracts. Biopein® has potent anti-microbial properties, making it an ideal ingredient for natural personal care and cosmetic applications.

Is there a difference between broad spectrum anti-microbial preservative and potent anti-microbial properties?  The difference may be real or the difference may just be in the marketing . . .

I believe a true preservative (synthetic or natural) should state (not imply) that it is broad spectrum and be effective against gram positive and gram netative bacteria, yeast & molds.

Biopein may be a true preservative; however, you can't tell by the description.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2012, 01:30:09 PM by Opulence » Logged

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