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Author Topic: Best mold material???  (Read 6103 times)
Bubbly2
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« on: May 06, 2012, 06:46:17 AM »

Soap molds are getting me down!  Nobody tells you that molds can be a big pain in the patoot! Shocked
What is the best material for molds?  Silicone, plastic or HuhHuhHuhHuhHuh?
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situ
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« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2012, 09:19:19 AM »

I have not had good luck with either, although others on here have.  I've used silicone bread molds from JoAnn's, and plastic, individual molds and I have a hard time removing my soap from them.  The best luck I've had and the mold I continue to use almost exclusively is a wood loaf mold.  Sure, lining them with freezer paper is a pain, but it's also part of the nature of the beast.  At least my loaves come out whole rather than in pieces.  I also use 3 inch pvc pipe for any excess soap, first coating it with a thin film of petroleum jelly, and placing a sheet of plastic and cap on one end.  Stand it up and fill it.  Some people coat the inside with a sheet of freezer paper.  I tried that and it does definitely make it easier to remove from the mold. 
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soap1967
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« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2012, 09:23:37 AM »

i prefer Steve's acrylic slab molds. 
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sudsmum
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« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2012, 12:25:48 PM »

I think it all depends on individual preference.  Like Situ, I mostly use the wood log and 3-inch round pvc pipe molds.  I have an acrylic slab and it is great for inserts and swirls but is fragile and expensive to replace.  My next slab investment will be wooden.  I use silicon individual molds but find a freezer is a great companion to help unmold.  I won't invest in silicon loaf molds.  They are flimsy and awkward to handle while soap is liquid or very soft.
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soaplover
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« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2012, 05:16:37 PM »

I use an acrylic log mold and I do like it, although I do have to line it.  I like the look of the bars with the log mold, you have the freedom to sculpt the top.  But then, with the slab molds, you can have more freedom doing swirls.  I would love to try Steve's slab molds, but right now budget does not allow.
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Bubbly2
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« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2012, 05:50:40 PM »

sudsmum, I glad you mention the hard to handle part of silicon molds....I have some silicon muffin pans and they are definitely hard to handle!  It sounds like wood molds are the best of a "rock and a hard place" choice.  Of all the info I have gleaned from online, books, this forum, etc. NOBODY has said how difficult it is to get soap out of the molds.  Listen up authors!! Grin
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klondikekate
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« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2012, 09:09:07 PM »

I also prefer the loaf shape molds but always hated the process of lining them. As my sales and production increased I decided to look into silicone lined wooden loaf molds. There are a few different ones out there (Silvermoon and Woodfields) but, since I live in Canada I decided to go with a Canadian Co.- LifeWorks. Their molds are quite unique and thus far I am VERY happy wth them. A  bit spendy, but well worth it. Here is the link to the site. Be sure and watch the video as it gives a you a much better sense of  how they work.

http://www.lifeworksbylaura.ca/LWS005_No_liner_soap_mold.html

Kate
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Squeaky Clean
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« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2012, 03:57:46 AM »

Kate- that looks like an amazing mold!  Do you wash the silicone surface each time or will a quick wipe do the trick?  The soap seems to come out so clean.

It's nice to see another Canadian here.  Are you interested in participating in our next Canadian soap swap?
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ionagrace
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« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2012, 04:12:56 AM »

My favorite are the wooden loaf molds with silicone liners.  They are expensive, but to me, they're worth the expense.  Easy removal and easy clean-up. 

I also have 2 acrylic molds and I'm really sorry I purchased them.  They were also very expensive and getting the soap out of them has been horrific.  I eventually had to cut the soap out of the mold with a knife; wasting a lot of soap that was stuck to the mold and the dividers.  It was not worth the time, money wasted (on the molds as well as the soap ingredients), or frustration levels or clean up. 
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klondikekate
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« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2012, 07:20:10 AM »

Kate- that looks like an amazing mold!  Do you wash the silicone surface each time or will a quick wipe do the trick?  The soap seems to come out so clean.

It's nice to see another Canadian here.  Are you interested in participating in our next Canadian soap swap?

Yes, it is pretty amazing. A quick wipe definitely does the trick. The sides fall down easily and there is very little or no soap residue on the silicone. As you saw in the video, you do need to use a paper liner on the bottom- there must be a reaso n why they made them that way. I ordered 4 molds and tey gave me free shipping as well as a 100 pack of the paers. When they are gone I am going to cut my own out of butcher paper. One other note, the loaf is not as deep as what I had been using, so I cut my bars a little thicker. I actually like the new shape better, it just took a bitto get used to. The bar fits really nicely in your hand. Customers have commented on liking it as well.
Soap swap, tell me more.
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ceebee2001
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« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2012, 08:02:47 AM »

Kate, thanks for the link.  I am always on the look for Canadian suppliers. I am going to check them out.
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P
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« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2012, 05:46:02 AM »

I like Steve's acrylic slab mold when I swirl. I like using this mold when I add dried herbs to the soap - e.g. lavender buds- too, as I save from any impuritied that might be caused during cutting and the knife coming across a dried herb.

I like Steve's wood log molds too. Each time I use it, I certainly get a full gel... And I also have the liberty to arrange the size of my bars.

On the other hand I like using silicone cookie molds too. Soap has an enormous creamy and smooth surface when comes out of those molds. But unfortunately they are small in size, so I use them either for face soaps or for kids. One remark though, loaf shaped large silicone molds are no good for soaping because of shape getting distored during the hardening process.
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Squeaky Clean
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« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2012, 12:09:35 PM »

Kate- we did a Canadian soap swap in February.  There were only 3 of us so we swapped a soap and other product.  It was really fun and we're hoping to have more participants next time- I bet we can get 10 or so.  It's a great way to try others' products, get new ideas and also feedback on your stuff.  Are you interested?
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Bridgerov
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« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2012, 01:16:50 PM »

I've got two wood soap molds that we made out of 1x4s. We put removable ends on them and also made extra ends that we could put at various lengths inside the mold to accommodate smaller batches. We drilled holes in the ends and the sides so that we could stick nails in that hold them in place. With freezer paper to line them, they work perfectly! And so cheap. :-)
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songofhealth
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« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2012, 03:34:00 PM »

I use Steve's wood loaf mold. I also have a rectangular wood mold that will hold around 10 lb. Would you believe, I also use cardboard boxes. It can't be the kind that has a seam underneath, but one that is thick cardboard with no seam on the bottom.  I line my molds with eco-friendly parchment paper that has a silicone finish on one side.  It lines the molds nicely, needing very little to cut off the ends of the loaf when hardened, to make a smooth finish. I can lift the whole "package" - paper and all easily out of the mold, then easily peel the parchment paper from the loaf.  It's more expensive than freezer paper, but I use it to ensure no hidden ingredients from the paper can seep into the soap, for intolerance/allergy reasons, as I cater to specific food intolerance needs.
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