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Author Topic: A gel question.....  (Read 1173 times)
love2bgg
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« on: June 12, 2012, 04:09:43 AM »

Hi all....can someone clarify this for me? If you decide not to gel your soap do you put the mold in the frig? or just leave it set out on your counter? I am confused about insulating or not.....any help would be very much appreciated....still learning!!!!     Smiley


Regina
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soap1967
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« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2012, 04:21:24 AM »

A lot of that depends on your mold and your formula - if you have any superheaters you most likely will need the fridge. 

If you have a log mold it will hold more heat than a slap mold and you will probably get a partial gel even without insulating.

Slab molds, which I use, are far less likely to gel, but will sometimes, I find that has more to do with the temperature of the soap when poured.  Regardless I always refrigerate - would rather not lose a recipe to a partial gel ( though it only affects the soap cosmetically).
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love2bgg
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« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2012, 04:06:53 AM »

Thank you! There is so much to learn...it is great to hear from experienced people....have a great day!

Regina
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loolee
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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2012, 05:14:37 AM »

I was going to ask a question on gel, as well.  I don't really understand it.

Gel is bad?  Then why do some people *want* gel?

Do all soaps go through a gel stage?  And then they set up normally?  or do some soaps NOT gel?
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soap1967
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2012, 05:41:29 AM »

No gel is not bad.  Its the "normal" process for soap making.  We milk soapers avoid it because it scalds the milk and turns most formulas brownish/orange.

There is a difference in consistency between gelled and non gelled - some people feel the gelled soaps last longer, cure faster etc.

To me non-gelled soaps are creamier in texture and are opaque in appearance whereas gelled soaps have a translucent type appearance.

Non gelled soaps are a little more work - they need to be refrigerated.

What we sellers try to avoid at all cost is partially gelled soap.  it doesn't affect the soap quality just the appearance - there are some pics on the form of what this looks like  - imagine looking at the soap and in the center is a darker circle than the rest of the bar.  My local whole foods sells some handmade soaps and I have seen this being sold - I suppose if you didn't know any better it would seem the soap was supposed to be made that way.
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Martha
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2012, 11:27:37 AM »

I put my non gellers in the freezer for a day . The fridge for the next day and then out to finish curing.

I agree with Soap1967 the non gell seems creamier than gelled. I am about 50%/50% with my gel vs non- gel.
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P
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« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2012, 01:22:01 PM »

I agree with soap1967.

I like to gel my soaps if I use colorants, I swirl, etc. Colors or design in a gelled soap seems much more visible to me than a non-gelled one.

I've also experienced soap starting to gel after the 24 hours refrigerating time. It was a wooden log mold! So I make sure I use either slab molds or silicone ones if I don't want to gel.

After all, what is important to me is not to end up with a partial gel... So I either make sure that it fully gels or refrigerate to avoid any gel.
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